Archive for July, 2007

Burglar in the Library by Lawrence Block

Monday, July 9th, 2007

Reviewed by Carolyn Wood

Burglar in the Library by Lawrence Block mirrors Agatha Christie’s Body in the Library.  Check out http://www.who-dunnit.com/reviews/28/  for a detailed review of the work Alan Paul Curtis gives the read a thumbs up.  He pays homage to “Agatha Christie style mysteries.? Block’s work reads like a pop culture version of Agatha Christie’s, Body in the Library in my opinion.  Perhaps this is the appeal of Block’s work.  The characters are well developed and the addition of Raffles, loyal four footed companion adds frivolity to the piece.  I was pulled in by the characters development though the plot was too familiar.  The pace of the action felt jarring read on the heels of Christie’s gem.

The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie

Monday, July 9th, 2007

Reviewed by Carolyn Wood 

The dead body in the library of Colonel and Mrs. Bantry’s house belongs to a young platinum blonde.  Intrigue abounds as colorful characters attempt to uncover the identity of the deceased.  The dialogue does reflect the time period of the work.  For example, characters deliberate on the possibility of a “platinum blonde? actually existing in St. Mary Mead.  Consider the excerpt: “It accounts for a girl of this type being in St. Mary Mead.?  I would venture that tattoos and body piercing are not yet commonplace due to the preoccupation with nail care and hair dye.  Nobody can identify the woman, though many have theories as to what caused her demise.  This Agatha Christie mystery is more fun than a good game of Parker Brothers Clue.   Miss Marple is introduced on page 47 and readers have no trouble following her footsteps to solve the mystery.   

This week I also viewed Christie’s work on the small screen in the 1974 film version of Murder on the Orient Express.  I recommend viewing this movie if you get a chance as it is great fun to see a cast full of familiar faces.  My favorite cameo is Anthony Perkins as a character other than Norman Bates from Hitchcock’s Psycho